Five ways to improve your website’s bounce rate (and why you should)

Bounce rate is the percentage of site visitors that land on your website and leave before viewing a second page. You can easily determine your website’s bounce rate by setting up Google Analytics.

Now, if you’re thinking this isn’t such a big deal and that as long as they visit your website, irrespective of how long they spend on it or how many pages they view, they at least know your business exists, that’s not good enough. The longer visitors stay on your site, the more time you have to turn them into subscribers and customers. But how can you convince users to stick around longer and visit more pages?

Luckily, there are a number of easy and free ways to improve your website’s bounce rate and grow your business.

Here are five ways to improve your website’s bounce rate

1. Create content consistently

Creating content consistently is one of the best ways to keep users around longer and get them to view multiple pages. Useful, engaging content will drive traffic to your website. Once that traffic is there, they’ll stick around, keep reading, and eventually become a subscriber or customer if you have a wide array of informative blog posts for them to read. In fact, according to HubSpot, companies that published 16+ blog posts per month got about 4.5 times more leads than companies that published zero to four monthly posts.

So, create a content plan that’s consistent and offers something for everyone. Not everyone prefers written content, so include a mixture of formats such as written, video, infographics, audio recordings, and more.

Another important tip for your content: Practice effective internal linking. Relevant and useful internal links sprinkled throughout your content can guide users to more of your awesome content and keep them reading.

2. Add images and videos

Speaking of a mixture of formats, to improve your website’s bounce rate, be sure you add eye-catching images and videos to your website. Many users won’t spend a lot of time reading your website content, so you need to grab their attention with images and videos.

Add a large high-quality image or video to your homepage to grab the attention of viewers as soon as they see your site. Most websites do this while keeping everything else on the page simple

3. Speed up your site

You may not have realized it before but your website speed is important for improving your website’s bounce rate. In fact, according to Google, 53 percent of mobile site visitors leave a page that takes longer than three seconds to load. And for every extra second that your page takes to load, the probability of users bouncing dramatically increases. So, don’t make your website visitors wait.

You can use a site like GTmetrix to test the speed of your site. Not only will it tell you what your site speed is, but it’ll also give you advice for improving it. If you’re running your website on WordPress, it would also be wise to download and install some free plugins like WP Smush and W3 Total Cache to help boost the speediness of your site.

4. A/B test

As you’re attempting to improve your website’s bounce rate, don’t leave it up to chance. You should be A/B testing everything in order to determine what’s working and what’s not. You might be surprised by the small things that can cause users to abandon your website. It might even be something as simple as the color of your call-to-action button.

So, perform A/B tests, or split tests, of every aspect of your website. Does your bounce rate improve with a popup on your homepage or does it get a bigger boost on another page? Does one font convert more visitors over another? Does showing or hiding a progress bar help or hurt your bounce rate? When we say A/B test everything, we mean everything.

5. Target abandoning visitors

Did you know that over 70% of people who leave your website will never return? If you don’t start to improve your bounce rate now, that’s a lot of potential leads and customers your business is missing out on. One effective way to stop those users in their tracks and get them to stay on your website longer, and eventually convert them into subscribers or customers is by utilizing exit-intent popups.

Original: https://goo.gl/85QWVB

Choosing KPI’s in google analytics

As more brands continue to invest in their online persona and digital marketing initiatives, it’s becoming increasingly important for marketing service providers (MSPs) to verifiably demonstrate the value of their work. The most successful and recommendable MSPs push to measure the impact their work has beyond a simple transactional level; by mapping and tracking multiple touch points throughout the customer lifecycle.

Know Your Client Inside and Out

When it comes to choosing appropriate key performance indicators (KPIs), it’s crucial to go beyond the surface level of sales. Every client has a different set of core business objectives, so the web analytics strategy that you implement should align with those objectives and be catered to your customer’s overall vision of success. The first step in defining the key performance indicators for a given campaign is to get to know the needs of your client and their business.

“Meet with your client. Call them on the phone. Shoot them an email. However you prefer to communicate, just get it done! Learn the history of your client. Meet or talk to the people that work there. Find out a bit about their local area. Get to know their business’s previous and current struggles. Discover the ways in which their business has had success in the past.”*

Once you have a deep understanding of your client and their business, you can more effectively map out the touch points that you’ll track and the metrics you’ll use to measure success. There are three key areas that you’ll want to focus on when it comes to mapping KPIs at different phases of the customer journey:

  1. Acquisition
  2. Behavior
  3. Conversion

Allow the Customer Journey to Determine Your KPIs

Keep in mind: these are only a few of the most common KPIs that marketing service providers track. The possibilities are endless!

Acquisition

Websites without a steady stream of traffic are dead in the water. Regardless of the amount of time you’ve spent designing your site and crafting the perfect copy, there won’t be any action further down the funnel until you start to attract new visitors. Luckily, there’s no shortage of opportunities to demonstrate the effect you’ve had on generating new traffic!

1. Traffic by Channel

Google Analytics captures and records the performance of each of your marketing channels so you can clearly attribute traffic to individual campaigns; how granular you’d like to get in your reporting is up to you.

Each channel will increase depending on the number and type of marketing campaigns you put in place. Strong search engine optimization will lead to an increase in organic search traffic; great PR work and reputation management may lead to increases in direct and referral traffic. It’s up to you to determine which channels you’ll focus on in order to tell the most compelling narrative of success to your client.

2. Users/New Users

In the screenshot above, you may notice that there are multiple data points in the columns labeled Acquisitions. Google Analytics provides more than one metric in each category so that you have more flexibility in determining what constitutes success for each campaign. A client looking to increase their brand visibility may be more interested in the number of new users to their site, whereas a client looking to increase user retention or new user sign-ups may be more concerned with the total user number.

3. Sessions

Depending on your client’s goals, it may be more beneficial to focus on sessions versus users. For example, a client hoping to increase the engagement rate of their current customer base may hope to increase the number of monthly sessions that their site receives.

Behavior

Once a user has landed on a site, understanding how they interact with and flow through the various subpages is essential. Under the Behavior area in Google Analytics, you’ll find a number of reports that include metrics like page views, average time on page, bounce rate, and more. These metrics will allow you to map the ways in which your work on the website have directly affected customer behavior.

1. Page Views

Describing the total amount of traffic you’ve generated is important when discussing the acquisition phase, but when focusing on user behavior and the next step of the customer journey, it’s necessary to get more granular. We all know website design projects and digital marketing campaigns involve new pages, new menus, and new forms. Being able to track which areas of the site are most engaging and effective is crucial. In Google Analytics, the Site Content section will provide numerous views to allow you to analyze the performance of individual pages on a site.

2. Average Time on Page

Being able to show a client that a page you created is garnering a significant amount of new page views is great, but not if those users are dissatisfied. A simple way to understand the effectiveness of a page is to analyze the average time that a user is spending on the page. Depending on the purpose of a page, it may be more beneficial to have a longer average time on page. For example, a lengthy and informative pillar page should keep visitors reading; alternatively, sites with video may have longer average time on page, since users will be watching a clip and remaining on the page. In contrast, an FAQ page or a contact page should have a comparatively lower average time on page since you expect users to find information quickly.

3. Bounce Rate

To take an analysis of page interactions one step further, you may want to look at the bounce rate of individual pages on a site. In Google Analytics, the bounce rate metric shows the percentage of sessions that include only a single page visit and zero interactions. In other words, if a user visits your site and leaves without interacting at all, that session will be considered a “bounce.” A high bounce rate isn’t always a negative! As in the example above, depending on the objective of a page a high bounce rate may actually indicate success. For example, an FAQ page that seeks to provide users with quick and simple answers to everyday questions might have a bounce rate that verges on 90% or higher; this could indicate that users were able to quickly find the info they needed and then left. Ultimately, it’s up to you to determine how to interpret the data.

Conversion

What exactly constitutes a conversion will differ from client to client based on their overall business objectives. E-commerce clients may want to increase website sales or newsletter sign-ups; service-based clients may want to increase the number of calls they receive or the actual number of bookings the site generates. Regardless of what type of conversion is chosen, this should be clearly defined at the start of a campaign so all parties are on the same page since conversions come in many forms.

Note: tracking conversions requires the additional setup of goals in Google Analytics.

1. Number of Conversions

Once you set up a goal in your account, Google Analytics will begin to track the number of conversions that take place connected to this goal. Number of Conversions on its own is a powerful metric; however, it is best used in conjunction with fiscal data from your client to calculate the ROI of your campaigns. Be sure to ask your client the average value of a conversion for their business. Remember that this will differ depending on the conversion type you choose: a phone call and a closed sale may both be conversions, but they aren’t valued the same. Once you understand the value of each conversion type for your client, you’re able to multiply the total number of conversions by that number to provide a monetary value for ROI.

2. Conversion Rate

When comparing the effectiveness of two pages side by side, it’s often easier to compare their respective conversion rates over a defined time period rather than the total number of conversions. Conversion rate is the total number of conversions divided by the total number of visitors a page received during a given time period, giving you a better idea of a site’s top performing pages. A page that receives 100 visits and converts 50 of them is much more powerful than a page that receives 5 visits and converts all 5.

Use Multiple Metrics to Demonstrate Success

The most important lesson to be learned when it comes to web analytics is that one metric is never enough. Numbers don’t lie, but interpretations do. Before presenting a particular narrative to your client, be sure that you have the necessary data to support it. Following the suggestions outlined above will help you track and analyze the effect of your work for your clients in a compelling and data-backed way.

 

Source: https://upcity.com/blog/choosing-kpis-in-google-analytics/

Top 5 Blog of this week 23-02-2019

Hi,

Plus 91 Ultimate Cinemas found some useful articles on the internet, which is related to a Social Media Marketing and Search Engine Optimization.

  • Andrew Witkin offers valuable tips to create an effective Content Marketing strategy.
  • Neel Sinha highlights the significance of Content Marketing for your brand in the year 2019.
  • Chelsey Church draws special attention to insights from Email Marketing experts.
  • Follow the tips from Jenna Tiffany to create an effective Email Marketing strategy.
  • Elaine Frieman highlights the best practices for optimizing your website, from the standpoint of Mobile.

Basic of See Think Do Act Care – SEO Strategy

Hey, today we are going to discuss about the SEE-Think-Do-Care strategy for digital marketing.

The “See- Think – Do-Care” Strategy:

strategy-framework-plus91media copy
See Think Do Care Strategy Framework-plus91 

See :

I see something interesting that resonates with me and my view of the world. Largest addressable qualified audience. It will establish what i like most, i need most. it may help full to attain brand awareness on me by knowing what i like to see. This method use in SEO, Social media marketing & PPC. There my post or ads or website will shown to people who search about specific things or interest on that thing.

            Objective: To know about you

            How: Drive awarness; inspire, entertain, and inform

            KPI’s: Brand Awarness

            Medium: Social media, SEO, paid media, Tradeshow / event           

Think :

I start thinking that may be i should investigate more to understand if this is a solution or ide for me.

This method will make option for user consider to make on action. We have to inspire them to do an action on our page like share, email subscription, download app, call actions. We can use this on SEO, Youtube, PPC Display ads medium.

             Objective: To look for you

             How: Drive Consideration; education, inform, and inspire action

             KPI’s: Branded queries

             Medium: Email marketing subscribes, onsite page content, downloading.

Do :

I do something concrete to connect and express serious interest by signing up for a free trail or consultation. A lot of commercial intent.

It about to make action on our website. We have to Convense customers to buy a product or subscribe. This comes on medium like PPC, Affiliate marketing, SEO, and Email.

              Objective: To buy from you

               How: Drive Conversion; enable a seamless purchase

               Medium: Subscription, meeting, proposal, trail

               KPI’s: Conversion rate, sales, profit

Care :

I am now a committed customer and i care about the company and solution, i have chosen.

Here they are current customers we have to taking care about their satisfaction, which helps us to re-marketing. we do it through SEO, SMM and PPC ads. It drives loyalty to repeat the purchase.

               Objective: To come back to you

               How: Drive  loyalty; surprise, delight, and reward

               KPI’s : Repeat rate, customer lifetime value

               Medium: invested customer, repeat payment, refer/promote

Top 5 Blog of this week 16-02-2019

Hi,

Plus 91 Ultimate Cinemas found some useful articles on the internet, which is related to a Social Media Marketing and Search Engine Optimization.

  • 9 Tips for writing Great for SEO by Jill Kocher Brown.
  • Claire Eby teaches how to position your business in 2019 with a strong company tagline.
  • Giselle Waters highlights the latest trends in Local SEO along with ways to optimize your presence in Local Search.
  • Debby Haynam discusses why it is imperative to improve page loading speed and remove unnecessary navigation links, for optimizing Mobile landing pages.
  • Vinay Koshy draws special attention to the Social Media visual content trends that can boost your marketing results.

Important Digital Marketing Modules available in 2019

Digital marketing is the marketing of products or services using digital technologies. In fact, digital marketing now extends to non-Internet channels that provide digital media, such as mobile phones (SMS and MMS), callback, and on-hold mobile ringtones.

Major Modules should be covered in Digital Marketing:

  • Search Engine Optimization
  • Search Engine Marketing
  • Social Media Marketing
  • Social Media Advertising
  • Email Marketing
  • Content Marketing
  • Marketing Automation
  • Analytics
  • Integrated Digital Marketing

1) Search Engine Optimization:

SEO is a three letter acronym short for Search Engine Optimization. Search engine optimization about trying to rank higher in search engines. To rank higher you make changes to your website that make it easier for search engines to understand your content.

Through SEO getting Backlinks is also easy i.e getting links from other websites. Search engine optimization (SEO) is the practice of increasing the quantity and quality of traffic to your website through organic search engine results

2) Search Engine Marketing:

Search engine marketing, or SEM, is one of the most effective ways to grow your business in an increasingly competitive marketplace. With millions of businesses out there all vying for the same eyeballs, it’s never been more important to advertise online, and search engine marketing is the most effective way to promote your products and grow your business.

Search engine marketing (SEM) is a form of Internet marketing that involves the promotion of websites by increasing their visibility in search engine results pages (SERPs) primarily through paid advertising

3) Social Media Marketing:

Social media marketing is the use of social media platforms and websites to promote a product or service. Although the terms e-marketing and digital marketing are still dominant in academia, social media marketing is becoming more popular for both practitioners and researchers.

Most social media platforms have built-in data analytics tools, which enable companies to track the progress, success, and engagement of ad campaigns. Companies address a range of stakeholders through social media marketing, including current and potential customers, current and potential employees, journalists, bloggers, and the general public.

4) Social Media Advertising:

Social media advertising is a term used to describe online advertising (paid efforts) that focus on social networking sites. Social media advertising combines current targeting options (like geo-targeting, behavioral targeting, socio-psychographic targeting, etc.), to make detailed target group identification possible. With social media advertising, advertisements are distributed to users based on information gathered from target group profiles

5) Email Marketing:

Email marketing is the act of sending a commercial message, typically to a group of people, using email. In its broadest sense, every email sent to a potential or current customer could be considered email marketing.

It usually involves using email to send advertisements, request business, or solicit sales or donations, and is meant to build loyalty, trust, or brand awareness. Marketing emails can be sent to a purchased lead list or a current customer database.

6) Content Marketing:

Content marketing is a form of marketing focused on creating, publishing, and distributing content instead of pitching your products or services, for a targeted audience online.

Content marketing is a strategic marketing approach focused on creating and distributing valuable, relevant, and consistent content to attract and retain a clearly defined audience — and, ultimately, to drive profitable customer action.

7) Analytics:

Web analytics measure things a webmaster or technical SEO specialist cares about, like page load speed, page views per visit, and time on site.

Digital marketing analytics, on the other hand, measure business metrics like traffic, leads, and sales, and which online events influence whether leads become customers

8) Marketing automation:

Marketing automation refers to the software that exists with the goal of automating marketing actions. Many marketing departments have to automate repetitive tasks such as emails, social media, and other website actions. The technology of marketing automation makes these tasks easier.

9) Integrated Digital Marketing:

Integrated digital marketing is, as it sounds, the integration of multiple marketing strategies to form a cohesive online approach for your business. Here’s what it typically entails: web development and design. search engine optimization (SEO) and search engine marketing (SEM) content marketing